Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
The Plum Blossom Blooms by RvBOMally The Plum Blossom Blooms by RvBOMally
The Battle of Kursk was a stunning German victory, turning back the Red Army's offensive and breathing new life into the Wehrmacht's eastern operations. The disaster spurred the Soviets on to focusing more of their efforts on Europe, ignoring pleas by the British and Americans to do something about Japan. Ultimately, the victory at Kursk was not enough to save the Germans from the Allies, as the British and Americans bombed German industry to oblivion and the Red Army crushed what remained of the Wehrmacht over a series of offensives that ended the European war in July of 1945.

The war in Asia continued, and while the West begged Stalin to intervene, the Red Army was exhausted and was occupying half of the European continent, and Stalin distrusted the increasingly hard to control Communist Party of China. Instead, Stalin placed his hopes on the Nationalist Chinese to act as anti-Western proxies in Asia. Mao would die of frostbite before the end of the war, which ended with the atomic bombing of Kyoto on August of 1945. The Soviets did invade Japanese-held Korea right before the Japanese surrender, which gave them the northern portion of the Korean peninsula, at least for a while. 

As soon as the Axis were defeated, the West and the Soviets turned against one another. Both the Soviets and Americans courted the Nationalist regime in China, while the Chinese were more than happy to allow the flow of capital from both camps to continue. The North Koreans began a war against the wishes of Moscow in an attempt to unify Korea under their rule, resulting in their destruction. The world fractured into the American and Soviet blocs, until the 1970s, when China began its own rise and became a third superpower. Proxy wars will be fought all over the world in lieu of conventional conflict, as all three sides fear the threat of nuclear annihilation. 

The world is divided into three camps. The First World is the American sphere, generally defined by its dedication to capitalist, democratic values. However, in practice the Americans are willing to support any regime that opposes Moscow and Nanking. Though America and its NATO allies, such as the UK and France, are full democracies, regimes such as Mexico, Colombia, Saudi Arabia and Iran are very much autocracies of one form or another. The First World is seen by its opponents as pie-in-the-sky idealists and hypocrites who speak of lofty ideals but do nothing to live up to them. 

The Second World is the Soviet sphere, the communist world and its allies. The Second World is far more lopsided than the First with regard to power, with the Soviet Union as the unquestioned leader of the alliance. The Warsaw Pact remains under Soviet military occupation, and any popular resistance is met with armored assault, as the Czechs and Romanians found out in 1957 and 1971, respectively. With the thawing of relations in the 1980s, the Soviets gradually opened their borders up to Western influence and experimented with market economics. Now, it is very possible to get a Big Mac in Moscow. 

The only somewhat independent allies of the Soviets are the United Arab Republic and the Latin Peoples' Union. The United Arab Republic is under the rule of the Ba'ath Party, which has socialist elements but is primarily an Arab nationalist party that is very much opposed to Islamic fundamentalism. The Latin Peoples' Union, founded by the infamous Che Guevara, has rejected the Soviet model for a more agricultural communism, which ended in disaster as the various Five-Year Plans all failed to meet their goals. The Latin Peoples' Union still maintains a command economy, which is unique among the modern Soviet bloc. 

The Third World was once a term for those countries not in the American or Soviet blocs, but now refers to China's sphere of influence. The Third World is not united economically, with Brazil being very capitalistic and India being more socialistic than the Soviet Union, but they are united in the idea of being independent from either Western or Soviet influence. Nationalist politics dominate the Third World, although of course the Chinese encourage trade between Third World nations and themselves. China remains under the autocratic rule of the Nationalist Party, which has put down democratic protests with rather appalling violence.

 However, China is opening itself up to the international market and is becoming the workshop of the world. China itself is now a very rich country after its economic miracle starting in the 1970s, and its ascent has worried both Washington and Moscow ever since. However, its allies remain very poor, which has only made Chinese power in the Third World that much more effective. With the Third World quickly eclipsing the Second, analysts all over the world are worried about a major shift in the balance of power that could cause catastrophe down the line. 
Add a Comment:
 
:iconbruiser128:
bruiser128 Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
Never got why the Chiang Kai Shek and his Kuomitang so against capitalism.
Reply
:iconrvbomally:
RvBOMally Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2014
Probably its association with European colonialism and the unfair treatment of China. 
Reply
:iconbruiser128:
bruiser128 Featured By Owner Sep 4, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
Makes sense, but I don't see Sun Yat Sen being against it at all.
Reply
:iconjeckl:
Jeckl Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2014
Nice map.

No info for 7 though.
Reply
:iconrvbomally:
RvBOMally Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2014
Seven is mislabeled as a second six.
Reply
:iconchowhound37:
ChowHound37 Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014
Would the USSR collapse sooner or later? Given the strain as the Third World appears to be surpassing the Comintern, I think that might happen...eventually.
Reply
:iconrvbomally:
RvBOMally Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014
Yes, eventually. That's when the shit hits the fan. 
Reply
:iconjeckl:
Jeckl Featured By Owner Jul 9, 2014
Could we get a map of that? 

Also since China and the US aren't friendly ttl, will there be any issues with the UK handing Hong Kong over to China? 
Reply
:iconrvbomally:
RvBOMally Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2014
I'll change it as soon as I get my hands on a computer.

As for Hong Kong, yes there will be problems. However, it's likely that the deal will go through anyway, as the West is considering rapprochement with China so they aren't immediate enemies once the Soviet bloc collapses.
Reply
:iconjeckl:
Jeckl Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2014
That sounds awesome.

Interesting I wonder how that will go....
Reply
:iconwilji1090:
wilji1090 Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Aw so no best Korea? :(

That actually makes me wonder if the Kim family wound up being executed by the nationalist government or if Kim Jong-il and Kim Jong-un remain in Korea?
Reply
:iconrvbomally:
RvBOMally Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014
The modern RoK is fairly autocratic, but the OTL one was for most of its history as well. 

Kim Jong-il got raised by the Nationalist government and is just a random bureaucrat. Kim Jong-un has been butterflied away. 
Reply
:iconwilji1090:
wilji1090 Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Aw so no "Only Fat Man in Korea" jokes? :P
Reply
:iconsilas-coldwine:
Silas-Coldwine Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014
Given that dystopia is usually on the menu, this one is interesting as a contrast. I'd personally say that this world is just slightly worse than ours up to that point.
Reply
:iconrvbomally:
RvBOMally Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014
Yep, I toned it down a bit for this. Although I would argue that Cross of Fire isn't that much worse off than OTL 1939. 
Reply
:iconklausvonkueste:
KlausVonKueste Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014
here things seem to go better than OTL
Reply
:iconrvbomally:
RvBOMally Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014
There is no Great Leap Forward, so millions of lives have been saved. 
Reply
:iconheliosmegistos:
HeliosMegistos Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014
Nice Work, Interesting stuff although I do have two questions.

1) How bad are things in South Africa and Rhodesia ?

2) How did Che what the fuckever manage to united part of South America ?. Historically he doesn't seem to have done much more then get people killed and offend his supposed allies.
Reply
:iconrvbomally:
RvBOMally Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014
1. As bad as they were in the 1970s. 
2. He took advantage of a worse situation in the southern cone. 
Reply
:iconheliosmegistos:
HeliosMegistos Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014
I guess that makes sense.
Reply
:iconkyuzoaoi:
kyuzoaoi Featured By Owner Edited Jul 8, 2014  Student Artist
When I've seen the Commie Argentina, I'm not surprised that Che is running it.

And those Senderista guys in Peru. Inca Rojas are their name, yet it is ironic they blew up Machu Picchu, probably!
Reply
:iconrvbomally:
RvBOMally Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014
Yep, I normally have crazy Inca nationalist communists, but now I decided to go Pol Pot with the entire thing. 
Reply
:iconottovonsuds:
OttoVonSuds Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014
Cool stuff.
Reply
:iconrvbomally:
RvBOMally Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014
Thanks. :)
Reply
:iconmeloa789:
meloa789 Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014
It would be strange to see McCarthy's campaigns against the "Chinese Fear"
Reply
:iconrvbomally:
RvBOMally Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014
McCarthy was rather supportive of the RoC, because they became hard anti-communists during the Cold War, due to competition for Asia with the Soviets.
Reply
:iconmeloa789:
meloa789 Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2014
I forgot that.
Reply
Add a Comment:
 
×
Download PNG 1204 × 892




Details

Submitted on
July 8, 2014
Image Size
93.4 KB
Resolution
1204×892
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
5,698 (8 today)
Favourites
61 (who?)
Comments
27
Downloads
80
×